“WE’VE GOT SOME DIFFICULT DAYS AHEAD”

Some Reflections on the Law:

Its Failures; Its Oppressions

And its Betrayals.

An apology to those readers who have been waiting with the patience of a Jersey Income Support applicant for the next post in our experiment in web-based legal advice. Well, apologies to all readers actually – it having been so long since I wrote anything substantive for the Quite Vile Blog.

Although the next dispatch recounting the latest news of our real-life version of ‘The Trial’ is nearly completed, it has been delayed – as certain, crucial information I need to obtain is being kept from me by the prosecution and the Jersey courts.

Not only has it proven to be immensely difficult – and I mean ‘immensely difficult’ – to get the Jersey courts to even produce transcripts of proceedings so far – I’ve been warned that such material is supplied for the purposes of the defence only – I assume to stop me publishing it here. In fact, I’ve even been threatened with “contempt of court” actions by the prosecution if I publish certain material.

OK – whilst I can see a degree of circumspection must be adopted when publishing material relevant to a live criminal case – I still very much get the vibe that the Jersey apparatus is especially keen to hamper my web-based legal defence exercise – thus further denying me a fair trial.

In fact – the defence co-ordinator – me – feels threatened and intimidated by the Jersey police, judiciary and prosecution apparatus.

Naturally, I’ll be publishing part 2 of our web-based legal advice experiment in a few days.

Hopefully.

But before then, I’ll have to attempt to divine a path through the epistemological semiotics of the prosecution’s post-modern, fluxing aporia – which they engage in with a commitment of which Jacques Derrida would have been proud. I’m reminded of the words of Foucault, who, accusing Derrida of ‘terrorist obscurantism’, said, “He writes so obscurely you can’t tell what he’s saying, that’s the obscurantism part, and then when you criticize him, he can always say, “You didn’t understand me; you’re an idiot.” That’s the terrorism part.”

You see? – It isn’t big – and it isn’t clever.

But when dealing with lawyers trying to prosecute you – the least you can do is find some compensatory entertainment in retaliatory word-nerdism.

A few months ago, I began the task of undertaking a major tidying and sorting of my office space. I was, perhaps, half-way through that exercise – having arranged across the office floor categorised heaps of documents, files, books, letters, transfer-cases, newspaper clippings and entire racks of note-books, filled with my illegible scrawlings, replete with “Life-Enriching” spelling-mistakes – when our very good friends, the ‘under-new-management’ States of Jersey Police Force, came calling.

They and their “Bosses” having decided to found and launch a new association – ‘The Jersey Child Abusers, Bribe-Taking Gangsters and Mass-Murderers Protection Society’.

Admittedly, the acronym doesn’t quite trip off the tongue – but the name ‘does what it says on the tin’.

I do such “stock-takes” of my political work two or three times a year. Things reach a stage when even the chaos-theory of filing begins to be tested by the sheer accretion of paper-work, so periodically, I undertake a kind of archiving exercise.

But when I eventually had time to complete that task on the last occasion, there was another purpose – namely attempting to identify what the Jersey police had gone through, copied or simply taken when they mounted their unlawful raid on my home.

Let me put it this way – an awful lot more material was taken and copied by the cops than they’ll ever admit to.

Virtually all of it covered by the protection of parliamentary privilege – and much of it being legally privileged as well.

Given that the Jersey Establishment Party have, so responsibly, ensured the courts have a lot of time available – by letting off 98% of the child abusers and concealers of child abuse – the administration of “justice” in Jersey is able to focus on the really important stuff – like arresting, searching, charging and prosecuting the first and only member of the Jersey parliament to identify, and speak out against, the decades of concealed child abuse.

For allegedly failing to renew my driving licence, and allegedly breaking the data protection law by disclosing public interest information – Barking Bill Bailhache has set his pit-bull top-dog prosecutor on me – one Advocate Baker. He had originally given the job to another Crown lawyer – but his ability to take the case forward with sufficient ruthlessness appeared to simply disintegrate upon receipt of my first letter – 16 pages – outlining what the defence requires for disclosure – and the relevance of those disclosures.

We’ve had three magistrates’ court appearances so far – and yet another directions-hearing scheduled – which will take place after my appeal to Jersey’s Royal Court against the magistrate’s refusal to accept her conflictedness. An appeal at which, incidentally, I’ll be making exactly the same ‘conflicted’ argument against the Royal Court.

And all that before we even get into a trial-proper!

God knows how much this exercise is going to cost, ultimately.

Plainly, I don’t have a prayer of getting just treatment at the hands of any component of the Jersey “justice” apparatus – so these proceedings are merely the first steps on that long and winding road to the European Court of Human Rights at Strasbourg.

But – before we get there, we have to go through the Jersey clowns’ pantomime; an exercise which will actually give me some time to focus on some important work.

You see, I’m paying no fines – and I’m taking the jail sentences instead.

In addition to being able to do some very useful and important constituency work in Jersey’s prison – I’ll be able to really focus down on the task of writing detailed affidavits concerning all I know of the various monstrous failings of the Jersey oligarchy.

Admittedly – it won’t be a happy task – for reason’s I’ll go on to explain.

Trying to work in an environment in which you’re surrounded by crooks, liars, aggressive homosexuals, gangsters and the educationally subnormal would seem a daunting prospect to many people.

But – hell – I’ve managed it fine for the last 19 years, so I just can’t see what the big deal is, I really can’t.

Actually, no – that’s too un-diplomatic – even for me.

I’d like to apologise to the in-mates of La Moye Prison. When I spent a day visiting 19 of my constituents in the slammer a while back, I came away from the process feeling remarkably refreshed at the candour, honesty and frankness each man exhibited. The contrast with my usual work environment was actually quite startling.

But joking aside – I said that finally having the time to write down my sworn evidence – in all its detail and breadth – would not be a happy task.

If what I write on this blog seems too satirical, disrespectful, inappropriately humorous, aggressive and – heaven forefend – “impolite” – just try to bear in mind the real tragedies – real people with their lives destroyed – people betrayed – so many accounts of gross criminality I’ve almost lost count – the utter horrors I have come to be aware of – and then at least allow me the latitude to express myself.

Frankly – the things I’ve learnt during the last two years – and then observing the Jersey establishment apparatus swinging into full survival-mode in order to crush the truth – yet again – would drive a saint to express anger, mockery and contempt.

And in that vein – it’s my task to inform you of the next round of betrayals.

Expect imminently an “official announcement” that yet another tranche of the child abusers are to escape justice – current, highly paid, senior civil servants amongst them – not that you’ll be told that, of course.

My sources inform me that even certain abusers with very powerful cases against them will avoid prosecution.

Well – I suppose it’s a “public interest” decision – isn’t it? After all – Jersey’s prosecution system and its courts don’t possess limitless resources. So if you have to, effectively, ration the administration of justice, obviously, letting off the child batterers and rapists is that hard choice you just have to make – in order to prosecute real bastard threats to society – like me.

But – at this stage, some of the survivors who speak to me are not even upset by it any more; they ceased to be surprised by the escape of their abusers a long time ago.

A while ago one of my “esteemed colleagues” submitted a thinly disguised rant of anonymous abuse against me. One of the – apparently – heinous “offences” of which I should be ashamed is “having no respect for the States”.

No. Two years ago I had no respect for the States.

Today – I can scarcely discover words adequate to describe my loathing, disgust, contempt and – ultimately – the shame I feel as a States member.

Let me describe how and why I feel that way.

When I first started investigating the Jersey Child Abuse Disaster in early 2007, I began to meet a lot of damaged people; people who had been abused, ignored, betrayed and oppressed by pretty much every single component of power and authority in Jersey.

These encounters increased and continued to the present day.

A notable, shared, experience of many of the survivors was this: in the past, they had told people in authority of what had happened to them; they had reported the abuses they suffered.

But they were simply ignored, insulted, dismissed – even, in some cases, threatened with defamation actions – or even with being sectioned under the mental health law – if they continued to “repeat these psychotic delusions”.

Therefore many – many – of these people had zero confidence in the Jersey authorities – the health service, the police, social services, the courts – all of it.

I just couldn’t count the number of times people have said to me words to the effect, “well, I’m telling you this because you’re the first person to publicly tell the truth and try and do something about it. But I just want it stopped. I’m not going to the police. Complete waste of time. Come on – this is Jersey, you know as well as I do nothing will come of it.”

That was a view I, sadly, shared – until I became aware of the covert police investigation in November 2007.

Suddenly, everything seemed transformed; at last – here were good, straight cops – determined to nail the bad people.

But still – the cynicism felt by many survivors remained.

So I did absolutely everything I could in my power to meet with, speak with, and try and persuade as many survivors as possible to go to the police. I pleaded with them. I said, “Look, you’re right to feel as you do about the past. You were ignored; you were betrayed – back then the cops were a part of the problem. But please believe me – this time – things are different. Take my word for it – now, there is no longer any hiding place for the abusers.

“But they will only be brought to justice if people like you go to the police and add your testimony to that of others.”

And many survivors – against their better judgement – listened to my words – and went to the police and the NSPCC with their testimony.

Today – when I meet with some of those survivors – and look into their eyes – I feel ashamed.

Ashamed of public administration in Jersey. Ashamed of the civil service – ashamed of the island’s parliament – ashamed of the police – ashamed of the prosecution system – ashamed of the judiciary – ashamed of the local media.

The survivors had to endure every nightmare consequence of revisiting their experiences; bringing the memories back, speaking to councillors, giving statements to the police – being subjected to repeated requirements to go through statements again and again, attempting to prepare themselves for the trauma of facing their abusers across court – and recounting their experiences to a room full of people.

And in a number of cases – having to tell their partners – for the first time ever – what had happened to them.

Sometimes with traumatic consequences.

All for naught.

A tiny handful of survivors have had some justice – perhaps one or two others still might.

For most – they’ve simply been abused – all over again – by the Jersey oligarchy.

When I look back – and think of the naïve optimism I felt in November 2007 – I can only shake my head and say, “how could I have been so stupid.”

“How – after 18 years experience in Jersey politics – can I ever have imagined that this time, truth and justice would prevail?”

“What made me think, for an instant, that this time they’d bring back from the UK a certain child raping ex-Jersey civil servant maggot to face justice – when the Jersey oligarchy had already let him off – twice?”

I feel ashamed.

Ashamed for Jersey.

But not surprised. I should have known better.

When considering the Jersey oligarchy – we are looking at a monopoly of power which has remained entrenched for over 800 years. Utterly invulnerable through some kind of mystifying immunity and protection – conferred upon them by the British Crown, and so immovably embedded as to be completely untouched by five years of Nazi occupation – which the Jersey establishment passed through comfortably, with scarcely a ripple.

No. Really – we shouldn’t be surprised.

When all authority and power in Jersey has effectively pooled in a cess-pit for centuries – we could have expected nothing better.

But to the survivors – I say don’t give up.

The Jersey Establishment Party may have closed down the criminal aspects of the investigation.

But you can still take civil legal actions against the States of Jersey. There doesn’t have to necessarily be a criminal prosecution in order for you to secure some kind of justice.

I’ll write in detail about the civil legal options available to survivors soon.

Until then – consider these observations.

Do not necessarily trust your lawyers or the firms they work for.

Be aware that legally the States of Jersey doesn’t have the proverbial leg to stand on – regardless of whatever cobblers your lawyers may be giving you about your cases being ‘timed-out’. Human Rights are powerful tools.

And be assured – that there are many people out there – myself amongst them – who will testify to the true, shameful incompetence, dishonesty, negligence, collusions, corruption and out-right criminality of the States of Jersey as an entity.

Which is why I’m looking forward to getting those affidavits written and notarised.

Stuart.

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