WILL JUSTICE COME TO JERSEY?

Almost certainly – yes.

Families for Justice vs. Jack Straw;

Legal Proceedings Launched Tomorrow

In London’s High Court.

Following my two, somewhat lengthy, previous posts, I’ll try and keep this one shorter.

So – we have run our opinion-poll and the results are emphatic and conclusive.

As can be seen to the right, of our 234 voters, 199 voted that the Jersey judicial apparatus could not be seen to be objective and impartial in any matter, criminal or civil, arising from the Jersey Child Abuse Disaster.

Only 35 voted ‘yes’, that Jersey’s judiciary could meet the fundamental test of appearing to be objective.

That’s 85% – to 14%.

A crushing majority.

But – consider the nature of our original point; that the good administration of justice cannot permit even the faintest taint or suspicion of partiality or bias.

Let us imagine the results were reversed; that it was an 85% to 14% majority vote of confidence in the Jersey judicial apparatus?

Such is the implacable nature of the requirements for the good administration of justice – such as the requirement, which trumps all, for there to be no suspicion of bias in judicial proceedings – that even a figure of 14% would still damn the Jersey system as not capable of being able to appear to administer justice objectively.

If we extrapolate our hypothetical, reversed results to the whole population of the island, and said that 14% of people who live here had no confidence in the ability of our judicial system to appear impartial – it would still be a crushing, mortal blow to the credibility of Jersey’s courts as presently structured and overseen.

But if our results were reversed in this way, you might argue “well – that’s democracy. The majority have spoken; they have faith in the court system. End of argument.”

But with all due respect – you’d be wrong.

The reason for this is that the administration of justice – is not necessarily the same thing as democracy.

Generally, we take ‘democracy’ to mean that the will of the majority carries the day; what the majority want – the majority gets.

And in functioning democracies – that’s what happens – via the political sphere. Political parties win their majority. They then form a government. Members of the legislature then approve the laws and policies of that government. All of which should be the democratic will of the people in action.

So why is the administration of justice different?

As we’ve already established in the previous two posts – stable, civilised democracies require a separation of powers – that the legislature and the judiciary should be two, distinct entities; each with their own particular roles.

Such an arrangement creates the existence of checks & balances, which, in plain English, means that no part of state authority can abuse power without being held to account by the other parts of state apparatus.

So the political sphere, the legislature, and all the braying politicians in it, make their laws and make their policies based on anything – from cogent policy reasons, to party doctrine, to which signs of the zodiac may be in ascendance. (Don’t laugh – that’s what Ronald Regan used to do.)

Essentially – the political sphere can eat, digest and excrete any old rubbish – quite regardless of objective facts.

But the way in which the judicial sphere operates is dramatically different to this.

The realm of democracy – of majority will – extends into the judicial sphere only so far as laws are concerned. Once the democratically elected government has made its laws – it can influence no further what takes place in court rooms.

For there to be respect for the law, respect for the courts, respect for the administration of justice – judicial processes cannot admit the political, the philosophical, the irrational – to enter the equation.

Courts must operate on an entirely objective basis – taking into account only the laws, the precedents, the evidence and the merits or demerits of the particular case before them.

This means that the judicial apparatus cannot operate merely in a way which reflects the majority opinion of the day. For if it did – the very basis upon which the concept of justice exists would collapse – immediately.

Suppose there is a civil case before the courts – involving some character who is widely known and regarded as odious by most people. Should that fact influence the court?

Categorically – no.

No matter that the odious individual be widely hated – if – in law – and on the facts – he is right – then he wins. End of.

No matter if 99% of the population despise him.

Or consider a person accused of some monstrous crime. The “democratic” will – the opinion of the majority – might well be that the accused simply be lynched.

Acceptable? Again – no.

No matter how repulsive the individual; no matter how wretched they may appear to most of the population – if the law and facts dictate it – the court must – and will – find them innocent.

So – democracy – and the good administration of justice? Not necessarily the same thing.

So even if a minority of 14% cannot view the justice apparatus as being objective and impartial – then that apparatus is not credible.

But – it wasn’t 14% who expressed no confidence.

It was 85%.

It would be difficult to overstate the apocalyptic implications of this result for the administration of justice apparatus in Jersey as presently structured.

They are crushed.

But it gets worse than this.

Our poll gave a result of 85% who thought that the Jersey judicial system was not capable of meeting the necessary appearance of objectivity test.

But – I can inform you that every – single – last – one of the survivors of the Jersey Child Abuse Disaster, with whom I have discussed the question of prosecution and court impartiality, has no faith whatsoever that the Jersey apparatus will deliver any semblance of justice.

That is the view amongst the key people; those who most matter – the victims.

Of those I’ve discussed this issue with – 100% of them have no faith at all in the impartiality of the Jersey prosecution and judicial processes.

And can we find that fact remotely surprising?

When the ‘Bailiff’, Jersey’s chief judge, and head of the judiciary which will deal with all such cases, delivers outrageous political speeches in which he makes remarks such as referring to Jersey’s “so-called” child abuse scandal, and that whilst the abuse was scandalous – “the real scandal” were the criticisms of Jersey?

When various members of the present judiciary have been involved in the concealment of child abuse in the past?

When Jersey’s Attorney General, William Bailhache – brother of Bailiff, Philip Bailhache, has pro-actively obstructed and delayed the charging and extradition of suspects against whom there are well-evidenced cases?

Suspects the Police were ready and eager to charge?

No – we cannot – nor could any thinking person – be remotely surprised at such widespread scepticism towards the administration of justice in Jersey.

There is another fascinating feature of the last two posts and the opinion-poll.

In both posts I expressly invited – challenged, even – any lawyers; Jersey lawyers in particular – who disputed the analysis and the jurisprudence to argue their case via comments.

I have received not one – single – solitary legal argument against my analysis.

You’d think there’d be one or two – at least; given that 35 voted in support of the present system – and that the argument I advanced flattens the traditional approach to the administration of justice in Jersey.

But, no. Not one single legal disputant has raised a case.

And whether they care to admit it or not – no such credible argument could be promulgated.

The jurisprudence, the case-law, the Convention Rights – all make our case insurmountable and undefeatable so far as the good administration of justice is concerned.

That much was plain and obvious to me when I wrote a detailed and lengthy e-mail to the Bailiff, the Attorney General and all other senior figures in the Jersey law enforcement apparatus on the 15th November, 2007.

In that e-mail I explained – on an evidential basis – why the Jersey apparatus was not capable of meeting the appearance of objectivity test.

Even though I was not aware of the covert Police investigation at the time of writing the e-mail – I knew enough – through my own researches – to know we had a child protection catastrophe on our hands – and that these matters would, eventually come before the courts.

I concluded this detailed e-mail with a simple question; I invited them to accept that the Jersey law-enforcement agencies were hopelessly conflicted in respect of the inevitable child abuse cases coming to court, and that they should – voluntarily – recuse themselves from any involvement and instead invite the authorities in London to appoint independent prosecutors and judges.

Although the argument was overwhelming, I knew – of course – what the response would be.

With predictable haughty arrogance, both of the Bailhache brothers responded, essentially contemptuously dismissing my concerns.

I knew then that the path from that point would lead to where we arrive tomorrow.

The registering of papers with the High Court in London against the relevant UK Minister, in this case Jack Straw.

That destination was as plain-as-day to me back then. In fact, knowing full-well the power and arrogance of the Jersey oligarchy – I told survivors and whistle-blowers back in last July that we had no chance of securing justice unless we forced London to intervene.

So, tomorrow – under the banner of Families for Justice – John Hemming MP and I initiate our court action against the UK government for its failure to ensure the rule of law and the good administration of justice in Jersey.

And such is the strength and clarity of the case – I’m very confident we will, ultimately, win.

But – even considering the possibility of defeat; of the Jersey oligarchy wining – such a victory on their part would be entirely pyrrhic.

The nature of the evidence, the facts, the testimony from so many witnesses – so much truth – would destroy them. Even if they staggered from the court somehow victorious in some, technical legal sense – their standing, reputation and credibility would – still – all be annihilated.

I guess I felt in my bones – when it became clear the establishment were desperately trying to get rid of me as Minister, in an attempt to perpetuate the culture of concealment – around the end of July, 2007 – that this might be – The End – after 800 years – for the Jersey oligarchy.

And – ironically enough, I knew then that they could – with some serious common sense and humility – dodge the bullet; for example, by accepting the points I later made in my e-mail of the 15th November.

But – with equal irony – I knew back then that they simply would not take any such evasive action; that they would sink themselves through arrogance, hubris – and a deluded sense of utter invulnerability.

And so it has come to pass.

I suppose if I had to pick out one – of the multitude of catastrophic mistakes the Jersey oligarchy has made – as the most damaging, pivotal and damning – it would be Philip Bailhache’s speech – delivered on Liberation Day – in which he denigrated the child abuse investigation, insulted and wounded the survivors and poured contempt on the national media who – unlike the Jersey media – had ripped the lid off of the whole, festering mess.

A rabid Political speech by the head of Jersey’s judiciary – the same judiciary which, in theory, should be dealing with the Jersey Child Abuse Disaster objectively and impartially – in a manner which avoids even the merest suspicion of bias.

The Bailhache brothers – Philip and William are arch-Jersey conservatives; paternalistic, power-crazed, insular – and rabidly traditionalist.

Rather than embracing the 21st century – both have striven to turn the clock back to some Victorian age of deference; back to the days when the Jersey ruling elite simply did as it pleased – and people had neither the ability or will to challenge entrenched power in the island.

It is, perhaps, a final irony – that the mortal blows against the established order of things in Jersey have been – finally – administered by the Bailhache brothers.

Jersey’s profoundly unhealthy concentration of power; its ancient conflation of legislature and judiciary; its near-complete lack of effective checks and balances – finally destroyed – by two conservative, arch-traditionalists.

Stuart.

81 thoughts on “WILL JUSTICE COME TO JERSEY?

  1. Anonymous

    Hi Stuart

    Good luck tomorrow, your courage and determination to see real justice for all those people afected by abuse in Jersey is inspiring

    Take care

    Reply
  2. Anonymous

    Impressive posting Stuart – it caused me to look back through your blog for more.

    What is this all about? What is a trustafarian nephew?

    “….my reward is the occasional comedic ‘green-ink’ abuse which arrives from the paeds, the civil servants supporting the paeds, and spotty, trustafarian nephews of the paeds – who sit in sad, masturbatory isolation before their computer screens wondering how long it will be before the family trait grips them. “

    Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Trustfarian definition
    A rich young white person, from a mansion house in the shires, usually with trust funds from mummy and daddy yet pretends he is poor. This species, more often than not, have dreadlocks, wear ethnic clothing, play the digeree-doo, dodge soap and generally mope around thinking they alternative and above everyone else. Over the last 20 years or so they have infested India, Thailand and Nepal under the premise they are travellers, not tourists. Most will end up working for their daddy as a venture capitalist.

    Zoompad

    Reply
  4. Anonymous

    Dear Stuart

    Firstly I would like to sincerely thank you for all that you are doing in trying to bring the guilty to justice.

    If you would permit me, as one of the victims of the couple who were released without charge on 24 June 2008 despite clear evidence against them, I would like to clarify a few things as reported in the article from the Times online of today’s date. The article reads “the barrister (Simon Thomas) told detectives he had revised his view, citing as reasons that the wife was unwell, a witness had rung the police to say they were holding the wrong people and the couple’s children said their parents were “good people”.

    Firstly, this women was and always has been a great actress pretending to be ill when she knew she had gone too far, praying for forgiveness. She used to give the performance of a life time by proudly showing off the “perfect family” when visitors came round whether they were family friends or Child Care Officers. She may well have been ill the day she was arrested, the shock of being arrested and finally her evils and brutality coming out into the open was perhaps a bit too much for her to bear. Welcome to the world of being scared and having no control over it! I believe that the Detectives dealing with this case knew that she was acting that day but who can prove it?

    Secondly, the person who phoned the police to say that they were holding the wrong couple, was I believe my younger Brother, a man who some eight or nine years ago told my then Advocate that he was going to kill me. This so called man will do anything to hurt me but in doing so he is hurting himself and his family too. He is no more than a coward who is now scared of being found out that he has been telling lies to the Detectives and Lawyers. News flash baby Brother, they are not stupid. My message to him is clear and simple. You cannot hurt me anymore than the pain that I have suffered all my life. You cannot take away my dignity as that was stolen from me as a child. You cannot take away my confidence as that was stolen from me as a child. You cannot take away the pain and horrendous memories that I suffer now as these were given to me as a child and will stay with me to the day I die.

    Finally, all this happened more than 30 years ago. Their children are no longer children and therefore cannot be made to tell the truth and of course, they are going to say that their parents are good people; after all they are going to want to protect them.

    God, if there is any justice in the world, please help Stuart to find it.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    So, the obvious question. What happens when you lose the court case?

    Assume for a moment that this happens, and the UK Court has basically decided Jack Straw does not need to interfere, then what? With the courts basically saying he has no need to interfere he is never going to do it off his own bat. Does that leave us with the Jersey Justice system as the only hope?

    Reply
  6. Stuart Syvret

    “Loosing the Court Case”

    A commenter asks ‘what if we lose? Does that mean we fall back on the Jersey “justice” system?’

    No.

    We appeal the case – all the way to Strasbourg, the European Court of Human Rights.

    And if all else has failed – we will win there.

    To loose in Strasbourg – would require the European Court of Human Rights to overturn and abandon a mountain of established ECHR case-law – dozens of its own precedents.

    Although they believe they are the centre of the universe – the Jersey oligarchy just aren’t that important.

    Even today – the Jersey Attorney General is still insisting he can be seen to be objective in these matters; a spectacle that is almost funny in a tragic and absurd kind of way.

    I have often spoken of just how arrogant and power-crazed these people are. But this time – the new reality of the modern world is going to, finally, crush that sense of invulnerability the Jersey oligarchy usually feel.

    For a measure of just how appaling these events have been for survivors – read the first-hand experiences of the person who has submitted a comment above concerning the refusal of the Jersey Attorney General’s Office to charge the two suspects – even though the lawyers had said the evidence to charge was present and the Police wanted to charge.

    There are dozens and dozens of others who are suffering similar feelings of sickening betrayal – again.

    If the Jersey oligarchy believes that their pseudo-Victorian posturing, ‘old-boys act’ and infamous “friends at court at Whitehall” will preserve and protect them – this time, they’re in for a rude awakening.

    Stuart

    Reply
  7. donchais

    Stuart,

    From your lips to God’s ears!

    The abuse and cover-up are absolutely horrendous, but the continued mockery of justice by the Bailhaches, et al is profoundly disturbing.

    Reply
  8. Anonymous

    Has anyone got the photo of the German sensor happily working alongside J.E.P journalist/editor at their offices.

    Oh yes happy days

    Did the J.E.P ever apologise for its role or that in vilifying the role of the Jersey Resistance Movement for opposing the Jersey establishment (an establishment that shipped some of its own people to the concentration camps) during the War.

    Liberation Liberation Liberation

    Reply
  9. Anonymous

    How are they going to stop all the abuse survivors talking now? Are they going to kill all of us?

    I for one have made it very plain that I am in no way suicidal. If I come to some unfortunate end it won’t be through my own hand. If I got murdered by the freemasons for being gobby about them they’d only send me to glory, because I’m a Christian, hahaha!

    They ruined our lives, they abused us and then covered it up for years. They illegally vindictivly maliciously persecuted us all, and they’re still doing it now. They tried to cover everything up, falsifying documents and all sorts. The newspapers will not print our stories, they’re all too scared, or too connected. A lot of reporters want to, but they are not allowed to. When we meet each other, us survivors, we realise that we’ve all been treated pretty much the same. Some of us got abused more than others – I was fortunate, I was not sexually abused by them, just physically and emotionally abused. Other people who were with me were raped. Most of us were forcably drugged at some point. The English politicians know all about it. There’s loads more that they’ve done that Stuart hasn’t written about on this blog. There’s loads more

    I refuse to be terrified by the freemasons. They stink. They look stupid, marching around in their stupid pomposity, and their noses stuck stock staring at the moon, lording it over everyone. Don’t they realise how funny they look? Why don’t the people line the streets as they prance by and accompany the idiots with some a rousing military arm farting march? Battle of flowers? I wish God would blow every petal and leaf off every plant in Jersey to show His displeasure at the masonic tyrants! May justice come soon.

    Zoompad

    Reply
  10. Stuart Syvret

    Zoompad

    “Trustafarian”.

    Great description. Bang on the money.

    In the Jersey context they don’t all have dreadlocks – but their pseudo-“street-cred” tends to revolve around surfing.

    Pretending to be nature-loving, cool, surfer dudes – “man”. Wearing scruffy cut-off denims and driving knackered old VW camper vans. And – like, just, you know – not being into materialism and all that breadhead stuff.

    I’ve even written a short passage on such creatures amongst the various fragments of novel I work on when time permits. OK – It’d probably be crap – even if I finished it – but it enables me to get a lot off my chest.

    Stuart.

    Reply
  11. Anonymous

    Stuart
    the spineless politicians are staying so quiet at the moment.

    Hope they continue to stay quiet nearer the election. I am looking forward to asking some difficult questions of them at the hustings. I will not vote for any of the GST 28 or any of them who have hampered and not supported the abuse enquiry, (which is practically all of them) historic and/or more recent.

    Reply
  12. Anonymous

    any idea what is happening to Simon Bellwood. Yet another person bullied unfairly treated by Health and the politicians. Have they no shame.

    Is the self same service being monitored on a regular basis by independents or will more scandals appear in the future (if the management do not get there first with their brooms to hide it all under the carpet. Ah well, we can always bring Williamson back, he knows the drill now.

    First class service, I do not think so.

    Reply
  13. Anonymous

    Yes, I suppose most of the GST 28 are now all going to support removing the GST on food. Just before the election. Do they really think the electorate are so stupid that they will believe the spin.

    Reply
  14. Anonymous

    Mark Stone, Sky News reporter

    The man in charge of Jersey’s child abuse investigation has said that his whole inquiry is being obstructed by the very people appointed to bring charges against suspects.
    In a damning memo obtained by Sky News, former Deputy Chief Officer Lenny Harper said the obstructions were destroying victims’ faith in the island’s justice system.

    He wrote: “This is illustrated by a briefing I have had from the NSPCC Counsellor working alongside (the police).

    “He has received a text message from a victim to say, ‘It is a joke. Another two walk away. No wonder no one will come forward.'”

    Mr Harper continued: “I feel, as do the investigators, that we were badly let down by the legal advice delivered from afar.”

    He added that he had received a “shoddy and unprofessional service”.

    The memo is being used as evidence in an application to the High Court in London.
    The Island’s former Health Minister, Stuart Syvret, who is a long-time critic of his own island’s government, is demanding that Jack Straw MP, the UK Justice Secretary,
    take over the investigation and appoint an independent legal team.

    “On the island, we have a breakdown in the rule of law,” Mr Syvret told Sky News.

    “Police being wilfully obstructed by the Attorney General (William Bailhache) and his agents…. Jack Straw must intervene and appoint independent judges to the island.”
    Police have now completed their search of the former children’s home on Jersey’s east coast.

    Since February they have discovered more than 150 human bone fragments and 65 children’s milk teeth.

    They have obtained detailed accounts from more than 150 alleged victims of abuse.
    Many of the accounts, some heard by Sky News, are horrific. Former residents spoke of rape, drugging and beatings at the hands of their carers.

    Many of the alleged victims claim that they tried to come forward in the past but that their accusations were ignored.

    But despite police saying they have more than 40 suspects, only three have so far been charged with any crimes.

    A murder investigation is unlikely despite human remains being found at the home because carbon-dating has been inconclusive.

    Mr Harper’s leaked memo gives an insight into methods of justice and governance on Jersey.

    It reveals that the island’s Attorney General, William Bailhache, wanted to appoint an independent lawyer to assist the inquiry.

    Mr Harper quoted Mr Bailhache as saying this was “in order to prevent you from barking up the wrong tree at an early stage”.

    Mr Harper wrote: “There was some discussion over his wish to have the lawyer placed within the incident room. I, the Association of Chief Police Officers, and others saw this as a highly unusual step, and objected to that situation.”

    It also reveals that the Attorney General questioned the publicity the police were giving to the investigation.

    Mr Harper claims in the memo that Mr Bailhache was of the view that “the circulation list for… police press releases is too wide and encourages wider comment”.

    In response to that concern, Mr Harper wrote: “What would happen if we did indeed cut our circulation list? (The media) would… ask why.

    “When we gave the truthful answer that the AG thought it a good idea to curtail circulation and a wider coverage they just might, in the light of the many allegations of cover up against his office, think that they had here positive evidence of the ‘wilful obstruction’ which he was recently accused of.

    “No matter how unjust that might be, it would be an obvious outcome.”
    Mr Bailhache has not returned Sky News’ request for an interview.

    Reply
  15. Anonymous

    difficult times ahead for the AG et al . Who will they charge out of all the suspects and the evidence in front of the “independent lawyers”. It will not be based on the available evidence – it will be based on about damage limitation.

    Who will blab the least, thats the criteria. However once the dam is slightly cracked the whole torrents of truth will belch out.

    Reply
  16. Anonymous

    Lenny for senatorial elections, I wish.

    If he cannot do it, can we have Eddie the dog. Again, he would be a great improvement on the current pack of liars, cheats, “team players” and spin merchants.

    Reply
  17. Anonymous

    List of likely electorial candidates to maintain States of Jersey government’s calibre and groupthink mentality:

    Bored 1.1ks
    Corrupt business men
    Masons
    Failed civil servants
    Retired “do gooders” boosting their pension
    (list is not exhaustive)
    Glory boys aka PO

    Anyone think of any others?

    Reply
  18. Stuart Syvret

    Senatorial Elections

    Now, look here! Eddie the dog may well be a brilliant candidate – certainly more articulate than the average States member – but on the animal front, it’s my monster cat, Sydney, who’s The Boss.

    He comes into the room, when I’m working late at night, and marches over the keyboard of my laptop. He sleeps very elegantly – though he does have his less than pleasant traits – such as mole-hunting.

    He will sit for an hour at a mole hill – until he sees the heap of ground move a little – and then dig furiously and hook out the poor creature. I try to stop him; but I guess his ruthless streak would be needed in politics.

    Stuart.

    Reply
  19. Anonymous

    Your cat is probably a good bet especially if he does not like moles?? The COM would love Secret Sid. lol

    Reply
  20. Anonymous

    Stuart,

    I am so relieved to read this post, I hope with all my heart you are successful. I have sent you an e-mail detailing my court experiences which I think may give you some insight as to why I am so relieved, not only for myself but for the future of all victims who may have to go to court. I am behind you all the way. all the very best. R.

    Reply
  21. Stuart Syvret

    Sydney & the Council of Ministers.

    Nah – Syd has good taste and is cool. He wouldn’t join with the CoM.

    He has better ethics too. He may well eviscerate moles – but that’s just the way nature made him.

    Stuart.

    Reply
  22. Anonymous

    It of course must be remembered that it is entirely possible that some of the leader may also be paedophiles and number amongst the suspects. Why else would they do everything they can to nobble the police investigation?

    Me thinks they protest too much..

    Keep up your fine work Stuart you’re a true super hero m8.

    Reply
  23. Advocatus Diaboli

    I’m pleased to read that the legal challenge has begun. I’m looking forward to the puerile excuses for passing by on the other side that Jack-the Lad trots out. Getting it all on record is the one thing they can’t gainsay.

    Good Luck everyone!

    Reply
  24. Anonymous

    With now almost daily reports of unease at Jersey establishment in British media

    its time to reflect

    the issue has always been the lack of an investigation into issues of concern to the public

    not what comes out….

    that is almost secondary (obviously not to the individuals concerned I accept)

    this issue must be transparency and the failure as always of the Jersey ruling class to investigate or accept mistakes have been made now, recently and in the past

    this is not about just one issue

    Reply
  25. Anonymous

    ‘Has anyone got the photo of the German sensor happily working alongside J.E.P journalist/editor at their offices.’

    He is still there! He lives in Ben Queree’s desk! They feed him ale and sausages and reminisce about the good old days. Sometimes Willy B comes over for a couple of beers. It’s really very beautiful.

    Reply
  26. Anonymous

    Lenny Harper has made reference to the good people of Jersey – the majority, well I count myself amongst that number and I am appalled at the covert and not so covert attempts by those in the hierachy to sweep what they can under the carpet, it is time for them to stop and to stop now!

    With the ammount of money thrown at this investigation and the underlying factors it is just not acceptable for files to sit on someones desk for months effectively stopping the momentum of this enquiry. was not Vernon Tomes ousted for a similar trait?
    Let the courts decide who is guilty not a group of teh islands ‘elite’ and recruited cronies behind closed doors. THAT IS NOT JUSTICE!

    We can all see what occuring – it is a proccess called ‘The Jersey Way’ wherein certain islaners will be protected because of who they are and who they know and where they come from.

    Commentators may say that is part and parcel of living in such a close knit community a common feature of a micro state, that does not make ‘The jersey Way’ the right way.

    Take this case to the ECHR because sadly that will be the only way that the victims will get justice, it is indeed tragic that after all that these people have been through they have to go through this final indignation and endure more years of emotional battery at the hands of teh Jersey Establishment because allmost to a man they have been to cowardly to stand up publically and say this judicial process is WRONG.

    Where are our politicians this week, what have they said about Lenny Harpers parting comments?
    Widely reported in the national media, and the usual party line prose in the JEP, copy that sits so one the fence not worth reading. Do we have a sound bite from Shenton, Power, Kinnard, Le Claire? As usual SS is the lone voice in opposition.

    Returning to the ‘majority of good people’ if we are on the side of the good, I suggest that the time is coming for us to stand up and be counted.

    People power in Jersey has been a long time coming but I sense that the only way to get this government to listen to the will of the people is by demonstration, by getting out on the streets and making our voices heard.

    The GST issue raised 19000 signatures, no it did not do much good but in terms of people power it was a start.

    Have the Care Leavers Association got the will to organise a petition and a march because our voices need to be heard as well – we are with you – let us show you.

    Reply
  27. Res Nullius

    Letters to the rag

    A couple of weeks ago a person by the name of Crill wrote to the JEP defending the judiciary.

    Last night a person by the name of Clyde-Smith wrote in to take a swipe at you.

    Now call me a cynic but those surnames sure do ring bells with me… Who can we expect next to jump on the anti-Syvret bus?

    Britney Bailhache?
    Hermione Hamon?
    Sadie Le Sueur?
    Carmela Cohen?
    Basil le Breton?
    Itex Walker?

    Reply
  28. Anonymous

    With regard ro `letter’s to the rag’,

    No doubt, they have all written to Jack Straw et al too! Claiming how fanatastic they are and how they had no knowledge of the cover ups.

    Similarly, they will claim that just because most of them are related by blood or mariage or both, are member’s of the same golf club, sit on the same commitees and frequently attend the same dinner parties, and milk the Jersey public dry with thier extortionate legal fees etc. Does not meen they cannot deliver justice or maintain the rule of law!

    The AG whose Big Brother just happens to be the Bailiff and who are both good friends of them all, and also of one of many of the accused (one who by the way is also a member of the same golf club and, attends the same dinner parties), has stated publicly that this is the case!

    So why the paranoia? Everyone and everything is in safe hands and both the Bailliff and his Little brother Bill (the AG) have confirmed this!

    Now I understand the French Revolution!

    Reply
  29. Anonymous

    Re – `now I understand the French revolution’

    It sounds like one of Phil or Bill or Bens’ after dinner speaches!

    I should know, I’ve suffered enough of them I used to laugh, but not any more. They are rather sad really………. Knowing what we all know now!

    Reply
  30. Anonymous

    Yup! Well they do say in St Martin that, justice in Jersey is the best a man or woman can afford!

    And that’s without taking into account the extortion practiced by the Jersey legal profession!

    Reply
  31. Anonymous

    Considering the French have `Marianne’ as thier heroin and the the Brits have `Britannia’! I suggest that if Jersey does the dirty and go it’s own way then they should adopt `Verity’ as they deserve her and she them!

    Reply
  32. Anonymous

    Well Stuart, there are a lot of scum on your Island and a lot of it has offices in Hill Street (I should know I used to work there)!

    But let me tell your public this. I rejected them many, many years ago! I knew then what many of you know now! The vast majority of these so called pillars of society are far more corupt than the average prison inmate!

    I Lived amongst them, I watched I listend and I felt sick to my gut at the vanity, arrogance and coruption.

    Unlike you Stuart and, your supporters, the very souls of these people are for sale to the highest bidder.

    And when, Phil, Bill & Ben (walker) have destroyed Jersey, which sadly they surely will. The majority of the Hill street mobsters will move on to pastures new as they always do!

    Sad really, but hiostory never fails in its repitition.

    Reply
  33. Anonymous

    PEOPLE POWER

    1. If our clergy wont speak out. Politicians are deathly silent. Its up to the people of jersey to get out there and show our support for the victims of abuse The majority of jersey people from all walks of life want to see compassion, justice and finally perhaps some compensation for these victims. Then maybe they can have closure.

    Reply
  34. voiceforchildren

    Stuart.

    I wish you all the luck in the world with this court case, you’re going to need it!

    No mention (to my knowledge) has been made of Lenny Harper being on your team. Surely his experience with our “ruling elite”, his knowledge, and I’m quite sure his proof of their blatant attempts to hinder the investigation would win yours and the alledged victims case on it’s own.

    He comes across as very frustrated with the “gangsters and halfwits” but at the same time very diplomatic which is a credit to him. Surely his time would be better spent, rather than giving little “teasers” out to the international media, but to support you in your court case and hand over any evidence he has.

    On another note I was having a chat yesterday with a friend of mine and he was somewhat bemused by the fact the top man Graham Power has been so quiet during this horrible sordid affair, have you any thoughts as to why this is?

    If anybody can get the alleged victims some justice and closure I’m sure you are the man, although I think you are going to need Mr.Harpers support one way or another.

    Best of luck, the will of the Jersey people is with you!!

    Reply
  35. Anonymous

    As Jersey man, I hang my head in shame when thinking of what my fellow islanders have done to children. There are no words which may come from my lips to return the stolen innocence or ease the suffering of that which they as children suffered, or dark inescapable memories which as adults they are forced to carry and suffer still.

    But one thing I can say, Senator Stuart Syvret, elected for the people, by the people and truly representing the people is fighting for the victims of these unspeakable crimes. The victims of these terrible crimes also represent something far greater which Senator Stuart Syvret is also fighting for, freedom!

    Yes freedom, freedom for all the people of the island of Jersey to be fairly represented in open and democratic government acting for the good of all people, freedom from the self-serving grip of the few which have maintained their power over the many using the power of secrecy to hide the collective actions which their positions afford within the framework of your government, judiciary and civil service; and freedom from the division of the electoral apparatus which ensures the entry of new blood to their small selective governing clique.

    Open the eye of your intellect and focus on the fact that Senator Syvret is fighting for far more, he is fighting for freedom, a word which has not existed in this government of the Island of Jersey for centuries……….

    Jack

    Reply
  36. Anonymous

    I keep emphasising that unless the huge volume of evidence is presented in a different way to the norm the pervs will get away with it. UK’s law is geared to protecting the abusers. I don’t think Stuart really appreciates this.

    The key is the future for the unborn children. The system is not in place to protect them. Same in the UK … and USA, etc.

    The pervs will still be at it!

    DT

    Reply
  37. Anonymous

    Stuart, don’t you ever get bored curning out the same thing over and over again? The same words, the same phrases, the same story. Circular arguments with the same ending. I sure as hell am bored reading it. Your blog used to be a bit different, a bit radical, a bit informative but now it’s just confrontational even when you don’t have to be, more of the same boring stuff. Trouble is, your hard core readers have now turned into more of the same, from the same elite fan club. Yawn…..

    Reply
  38. Stuart Syvret

    Churning Over The Same Stuff

    I’d very much like to have the time and space to cover a load of other subjects. Indeed, when I launched this blog, that was the idea.

    But – needs must.

    I have to use the blog – for as long as necessary – to drive forward the child protection battle.

    Sorry if that bores you – but it has to be done.

    Stuart.

    Reply
  39. Anonymous

    Did Martun Luther King or Ghandi to name but two ever get bored at going over the same ground and repeating the same message time and time again?

    Im sure they did, but look at what they were able to achieve through bordom!

    Strange world really!

    Reply
  40. Anonymous

    Re: “Stuart, don’t you ever get bored”

    I guess he has a limited attention span to go along with his understanding of how these abuses are hidden, and the system where the topic that is the most relevant is the topic that is discussed has some how escaped him too.

    Stuart your determination will pay off and in many ways it already has because if it stops because of the coverage and your brave stance then it should not happen again as safe guards will be put into place where there were none.

    That is a huge forward step but these people need to understand. “To move forward into a better brighter future one must be willing to face the challenges placed before you from the past.”

    Reply
  41. Anonymous

    Britain ‘ignores child sex tourism’

    British paedophiles abuse children abroad, and too little is being done to prevent the offences, says

    report
    By Jonathan Owen
    Campaigners say that the Government must control the activities abroad of paedophiles such as Gary Glitter
    Children are being put at risk by the Government’s failure to deal with British paedophiles overseas, according to a new report being published today.
    Sex offenders are able to travel the world abusing children virtually unchecked, according to the report, which accuses Britain of turning a blind eye to the activities of child molesters abroad. While British authorities await the return on Tuesday of convicted paedophile Gary Glitter after his release from prison in Vietnam, the report from Ecpat (End Child Prostitution, Child Pornography and the Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes) accuses the Government of ignoring scores of similar offenders who are abusing children in countries that are often unable to police their activities.
    It concludes that, despite increased reporting of sex offenders who are arrested for child abuse abroad, the Government has failed to combat child sex tourism. The report states there is a “clear pattern with repeat offenders travelling from country to country and flagrantly avoiding the stringent sex offender management mechanisms in the UK”.
    Although Glitter will be met by police on his return to Britain and put on the sex offenders’ register, many other paedophiles remain abroad with little or no checks on their activities, according to Ecpat, which represents Britain’s biggest children’s charities. In one case, a sex offender was able to return to the UK and escape arrest despite an Interpol warrant for his capture.
    Although Britain has laws to prosecute for offences committed abroad, these have been used in only a handful of sex tourism cases during the past decade and none since 2005. Yet in the past two years alone, more than 25 Britons have been arrested by foreign police for child sex offences, 15 of which were in Thailand.
    While thousands of football hooligans are subject to travel bans, only five foreign travel orders have ever been issued against known sex offenders. More joint investigations are needed, as well as more agreements with countries to make it easier to bring sex offenders back to the UK, say campaigners. “The Government is turning a blind eye to the activities of British sex offenders abroad,” said Christine Beddoe, author of the Ecpat report.
    Jim Gamble, chief executive of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre admitted: “Britons who travel abroad to abuse children in the belief that they can evade justice are a UK problem, and we have a duty to protect every child, everywhere.
    The Government announced yesterday that it is to speed up its plans to close a loophole that requires paedophiles to tell police their travel plans only if they are going abroad for more than three days. A Home Office spokesperson said: “From the autumn, we also intend to make registered sex offenders notify the police of any travel abroad.”
    Offenders overseas
    John Maurice Praill, 77, was arrested in Thailand in March for abusing an eight-year-old boy and released on bail. He has been arrested several times for similar offences. Campaigners say that the Government must control the activities abroad of paedophiles such as Praill and Gary Glitter.

    Looks like they are a protected species

    Reply
  42. Anonymous

    This is not surising the the UK ignore paedophiles abroad, when Jack Straws own brother is a sex offender!!! All the huddies, yobs, young criminals, destitute or ferral children, were created by the ignorance of a government so corrupt that children being abused is the least of their concerns even when most of these children will go on to display misconduct and criminal tendencies into their adult life simply because those adults around them are corrupted and thinkiong only of self. Jack Straw is a prime example of this.

    The UKhave no trust in Mr Jack Straw, For one very good reason he lied about protecting children when he was home secretary in 1997

    “This is his statment no one who has harmed a child and got a conviction for it will be able to harm another.”

    So ask yours selves this question how did Sara Payne come to die

    Reply
  43. Anonymous

    We in the UK a have system where there are lords sitting in the house who know others in their midst are paedophiles, we have the same situation in the House of Commons… We have some Members of Parliament who choose to ignore their constituents when the problems are of a historic sexual nature.

    We have a New Labour Party in crisis of leadership and facing a millennia in the wilderness after Brown has finished and all because there is no guts left in the toothless party who has systematically failed our countries children and instead of a country that can be honoured and held high as an example, we get a system that serves itself, and our children and now people have no faith in any of them.

    The rot has set in so deep as failures to address these malfeasant cretins who are actually meant to serve the people and are paid handsomely to do so simply cut themselves off from the electorate once their in power and then shit all over them…

    There is no political will to change anything as long as the manipulation of the masses is at a status quo, No rocking the boat, or causing unwanted problems for the bedraggled government with its head firmly plugged into the terra firma

    They pray that the news will say something unrelated to the government or political issues. International disasters and natural catastrophes prompt words like “It’s a good day to bury bad news.”

    Any kind of media distraction is easier than having to face the truth most of which if the public knew it would cause a parliamentary breakdown of epic proportions, and yet another example of the uphill struggle that good undertake to bring changes to the way our leaders understand and deal with the people who have invested their trust in

    Reply
  44. Anonymous

    Nice letter in the JEP Christopher Fairbairn.

    Why on earth would a Commodore of St Helier Yacht Club feel so strongly about our friend Senator Syvret & his mission?

    Reply
  45. Anonymous

    I am waiting for David Warcup to put his head above the parapet and say something about the abuse disaster/unexplained deaths of at least 5 children! The silence is deafening!

    Reply
  46. Res Nullius

    Even better letter from Trevor Pitman.

    Quote:

    “So there you have it, a ‘level election playing field’ for the States employee. Cancel this year’s holiday, take out a bank loan to fund a modest election campaign, then think about how you are now going to pay the mortgage, live, and feed the kids, all with no income.

    Fair? No. That is why, having taken legal advice this week, I am in the process of attempting to mount a legal challenge. The opportunity to serve the Island in government should be open to all, not just those with a suitably swollen bank account.”

    Get in there!!

    Reply
  47. TonyTheProf

    “Stuart, don’t you ever get bored”

    The media tend to ignore stories after a while and move onto the next headline grabber. Blogs like yours work as a counter-culture because unlike the media, they can focus – as you do extremely well – on the real issues in detail, over a period of time, and in depth. Now that the great age of investigative journalism is largely past (like World in Action, the 1hr long Panorama), it is up to blogs like yours to supply the deficit. Keep at it!

    Reply
  48. Anonymous

    The direction is now unequivocal to all and includes the oligarchs in this.

    Unambiguous fundamental from the ground up “Change” A change in leader’s all of them!! A change in policies and a change in how people of the island relate to each other, with the many victims being given a chance denied them for so long to have a normal life, if they can try to put behind them the horror perpetrated upon them by those who were put into positions of trust be the people of Jersey.

    I have heard many times that the people of Jersey are under attack from the world

    Sir Philip Bailhache, Bailiff who made a speech saying that no bodies had been found and that the real scandal was the denigration of Jersey.

    I don’t know one person who thinks this is the fault of the people of Jersey and everyone thinks it’s about the so called leaders who have not just let people down but broken a host of human rights laws, as well as internationally recognised prevention of torture legislation to which Jersey is a signatory.

    William Bailhache, QC illegally stopped arrests of proven abusers, as if there were no recognised significance to the continuation of a police operation.

    Employing a known paedophile as a police officer who went on to sexually abuse children with his new found impunity given by the highest authority on the island. Yes this poll axed me too!

    Philip Bailhache cut the microphone while Senator Stuart Syvret was delivering his speech supporting Jersey’s child abuse victims.

    William Bailhache, QC, and Attorney-General who was a partner in the law firm that represented alleged victims of the Maguire’s, who ran a care home! No victims has to date received any redress for these crimes, not to mention that it looks like the Attorney-General actually intervened which is also illegal

    They are in it up to their necks and the world knows it!!! It can no longer be hidden!!!

    The world is looking at Jersey and only at its leaders as we are wise enough to understand the social demographics in countries and characteristics as used in government, to setup smokescreens and spin the mirror in the publics face.

    You only fool yourselves!!!!

    Reply
  49. donchais

    Letter to the editor in This is Jersey

    From Don Filleul.
    I AM seriously concerned about the future of that magnificent property at Haut de la Garenne and write to seek support for its retention and use by the Youth Hostel Association.

    There is of course a powerful emotive reaction to the alleged horrific deaths of five children at this place; we must however remind ourselves that so far it has only been made public that teeth – not bones, not skulls, not other body parts – have been found. Over the past months the media, not discouraged by the investigating police officer, have printed and broadcast graphic headlines which have expanded in their passage around the world. One cannot blame politicians for worrying about the resultant damage to Jersey’s reputation.

    In no way can we fail to give full recognition to the abused who have been able to produce genuine evidence of the dreadful outrages to which they have been subjected. No police time devoted to the identification and punishment of their aggressors will be wasted. The magnitude of public sympathy has been quite exceptional and has encouraged the continuation of those inquiries.

    But for people to demand – as they have – that the buildings be demolished must surely be going over the top. To learn that the Youth Hostel Association might cease using what I understand to have been an extremely successful holiday resource would disadvantage and disappoint only those youngsters deprived of enjoyment.

    I suggest that no useful purpose could possibly derive from such a response and no miscreants would feel any pain, and on these arguments alone I plead for common sense to come into play and for Haut de la Garenne to retain its place in the service of youth.

    There is something else. An external consultant recently recommended that there should be a super hotel at Gorey. Just how many of our developers have already seen the opportunity to replace our heritage with another Radisson – and let it be known in the appropriate circles that their pens are at the ready over their cheque books – is of course not known to me. You heard it first here.
    Trellian, Rue des Murs, St Lawrence.

    Is he joking or just plain crazy????

    Reply
  50. Anonymous

    In answer to
    “On what authority could these two UK politicians act” Letter JEP

    From Ruth Nelson.

    First your island is not a democracy it is currently a plutocracy where money rules the roost and has done for hundreds of years.

    Your Island claims it own right to administer justice there upon! however when it is the justice system that is in question or when the more than obvious conflicts currently faced by the islands judiciary become the news or the accused then even the most challenged intellect (to paraphrase from anywhere) could manage to put this thing that seems to puzzle you into perspective. As your assumptions (Or to paraphrase to claim to assume something is not how the law works.)

    It is possible because the rest of you did nothing and wrote inane comments in the rag instead! It happened because Senator Stuart Syvret and other concerned people could not just stand by like most of your politicians did knowing that children were moved from the UK to Jersey Illegally and then abused, tortured and in some cases murdered. That’s why it happened and once again you don’t have to be a member of Mensa to see that.

    The mandate is simple! It is mandated by the convention on human rights (article 6.)
    The damage to the wonderful island has been done by those who are in power in jersey this is transparent already and the damage will get increasingly worse the more those at the top attempt to minimise the effects the more they will be maximised by true newspaper groups who reorganise what press independence means unlike the JEP.

    I’m sure that there are parents, grandparent and indeed great-grandparents who are also paedophiles, perverts and politicians this is a pound of waffle and has nothing to do with the problems at hand.

    These cases are not just allegations but in some cases proven facts that have been instrumental in putting a former police office put in place by your oligarchs to continue to abuse and help in the silencing of witness. It this takes time it is because of those in power on the island of Jersey are slowing the investigation to a snails pace to give them time to move the blocks in their pyramid into place so those at the very top can escape justice with as much wealth they can amass in the time.

    On what authority could these two politicians act

    Reply
  51. Res Nullius

    It certainly is long overdue that people should rise up at the ballot box and get shot of these incompetent clowns running our lives.

    There are going to be some who legitimately ask who else has the ability to be a minister in the COM.

    In answer to those people I would say that there are plenty.

    You do not have to have experience in planning to be a planning minister. You do not have to be a doctor to take over Health. You do not have to be an accountant to take care of public finances.

    All these ministerial jobs have qualified people doing what they are trained to do. What the minister needs to have is honesty, integrity and the guts to hold those civil servants accountable for their errors and to put their own hands up when they are responsible.

    That is what it takes. Don’t be fooled by those who say that there aren’t any viable alternatives!

    Reply
  52. Anonymous

    Thank you Justice for Families.

    Our Lord Chancellor is the biggest coward out there, without a bone in his body that understands Justice – so force him to handle this case.

    Let the courts take it on, and eventually I’m sure one or two points about Jack straw’s tactics will plunge the whole circus into the hands of Europe.

    Kill 3 birds with one stone.

    – Jersey Elite are not fit to rule
    – Care Home victims being ignored
    – Jack Straw’s Cowardice

    I’m sorry for the victims, they did nothing to deserve this.

    But My God, are you stringing up the Jersey Elite and Jack Straw.

    This will be a media circus, with nowhere for these politicians to hide.

    What goes around, comes around…. gentlemen!!

    Reply
  53. Anonymous

    What is a decent person? According to Celia Scot-Warrens letter in the rag tonight. She has great sympathy for all those who have (alleged) that they were subjected to abuse as children in care. All decent people are shocked by child abuse. Perhaps Philip Thompson, computer expert, intelligent, articulate, nick named the librarian might be thought of as a decent person. Yet he masterminded a worldwide network of paedophiles sending images of children being raped and tortured He has been jailed indefinitely. Celia also believes that (all) her colleagues feel similarly. I have yet to hear any of the states members apart from Stuart Syvret speak with any sympathy for the abuse victims. She is also is appalled that Lenny Harper has told national newspapers that politicians in Jersey don’t do sympathy with victims. I have read all the articles on his interview, the Times, Telegraph, and the Irish newspaper the Tribune, which was the most interesting. We should read and make our own minds up. I have my doubts that justice will ever be done there are to many people in power hiding these so called decent members of society.

    Reply
  54. Anonymous

    There does seem to be a repeated theme on this blog that the ECHR – Article 6 affords a right to a fair trial in respect of ensuring justice will be done and the rights of the victims will be looked after. Is there any chance someone can clarrify this. The wording is as follows:

    “Article 6 – Right to a fair trial
    1. In the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law. Judgment shall be pronounced publicly but the press and public may be excluded from all or part of the trial in the interests of morals, public order or national security in a democratic society, where the interests of juveniles or the protection of the private life of the parties so require, or to the extent strictly necessary in the opinion of the court in special circumstances where publicity would prejudice the interests of justice.

    2. Everyone charged with a criminal offence shall be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law.

    3. Everyone charged with a criminal offence has the following minimum rights:

    a. to be informed promptly, in a language which he understands and in detail, of the nature and cause of the accusation against him;
    b. to have adequate time and facilities for the preparation of his defence;
    c. to defend himself in person or through legal assistance of his own choosing or, if he has not sufficient means to pay for legal assistance, to be given it free when the interests of justice so require;
    d. to examine or have examined witnesses against him and to obtain the attendance and examination of witnesses on his behalf under the same conditions as witnesses against him;
    e. to have the free assistance of an interpreter if he cannot understand or speak the language used in court. “

    And it was my understanding that the only rights it ensures are those afforded to an individual charged with a crime (as would a straight reading of this article). It appears to afford no rights in respect of victims, or a right that people be brought to justice.

    Can someone point us in the direction of the relavent case law or whatever other basis this idea has come from, as a straight reading of the article doesn’t seem like it would afford anything like the protection that has been voiced on here?

    Reply
  55. Anonymous

    Re the letter to the rag from Don Fileul about “the magnificent building” that is HDLG
    I agree with Donchais – crazy! Most people who have lived in that building as I did for part of my childhood have always felt a sense of dread at the sight of the place even before the recent revelations. I was one of the lucky ones who experienced and wirnessed very little but I could not watch the last series of Bergerac because that place was constantly being shown. I have always sensed evil in that place and that evil will not go until the building goes. To re-open it as a Youth Hostel would be an insult to those who have suffered and died there.

    Reply
  56. Anonymous

    It must be pointed out to some people that article 6 protects the rights of the accused and the victim. So that being so the conventions are unambiguous, succinct and plain “A balanced full hearing.”

    Reply
  57. Anonymous

    fROM THE jep

    Simon Bellwood Investigation===

    A criminal investigation has begun into events surrounding the employment tribunal of sacked social worker Simon Bellwood.

    It is understood that police are investigating a senior civil servant in relation to evidence that was either heard or not submitted during the employment tribunal.

    This is the latest twist in the Greenfields children’s home controversy, which saw its former manager Simon Bellwood, pictured, dismissed after he raised concerns about the way children were being treated.

    Mr Bellwood said that the problems began when he scrapped the ‘Grand Prix’ system for discipline – which led to children, and especially new arrivals, allegedly being locked up in solitary confinement for 24 hours at a time.

    He had alleged that he was ‘bullied and harassed’ by his line manager Joe Kennedy while he was at Greenfields from 1 August 2006 until July 2007, and took his case to an employment tribunal in March.

    But after less than three days of evidence the case was settled behind closed doors due to procedural errors in the handling of the disciplinary process. The States dropped their opposition and paid Mr Bellwood a settlement after he agreed that he was not ‘sacked for whistle-blowing’.

    The manager of the centre, Joe Kennedy, was suspended days later but he has since been reinstated.

    WHO IS THE SENIOR CIVIL SERVANT – I WONDER IF IT IS THE ONE WHO IS CLOSELY RELATED TO THE SENIOR STATES HR MANAGER.

    Reply
  58. Anonymous

    Has the senior civil servant associated with the Bellwood criminal investigation been suspended during the investigation?
    I doubt it.

    Reply
  59. Anonymous

    “A senior civil servant in relation to evidence that was either heard or not submitted during the employment tribunal.”

    The mind boggles but im sure he will be revealed in the fulness of time.

    And about time too.

    Keep up the fight stuart your a true gent sir.

    Reply
  60. Anonymous

    No disrespect Stuart, but I am what would be deemed ‘middle class’, and I have been abused, tourtured, disregarded and treated like complete filth by the states, I may not have been institutionalised as a child, but I have been as an adult as a result of what they did. Perhaps its more a case that the states will treat those like filth, that they know they can. Vulnerable people, with no voice and no one to speak for them, no family to protect them, and no one that cares what they have been through, that is the reality for more islanders that just the ‘lower class’.

    Reply
  61. Anonymous

    Hi Stuart,

    Sorry this question isn’t in keeping with the discussion topic. I was just wondering what happens when victims can give a good visual description of an abuser, but doesn’t know their name? As this must surley be the case for many? Do they have any chance of learning who these men are or indeed prosecuting them? Or is it just a case of, ‘bad luck you cant name them, see ya’?

    Reply
  62. Anonymous

    Stuart

    Isn’t it SOJ policy to suspend any civil servant pending the outcome of a police investigation.

    Has this happened in this case?

    Is this senior civil servant currently involved in any disciplinary, grievance or employment related cases?

    Surely s/he should be revealed to ensure that fair and due process is being adhered to, to those who may be in receipt of his/her deliberations and judgements – or is this too much to expect?

    Reply
  63. Helder S. Domingos

    Dear Stuart,

    I would like to thank you for your courage and resolve in facing this oppressive regime, currently in breach of the UK commitments to the European commission and the world.

    I would like to share with your readers a letter that I have sent to the justice secretary.

    Here goes:

    Dear Justice Secretary,

    I have felt compelled to write to you this open letter expressing my frustration and deep sense of injustice with respect to the way in which the Haut de la Garenne child abuses at Jersey have been addressed, both by the islands establishment and by the UK government. I would, therefore, like to ask that the UK take over the investigation and appoint an independent legal team.

    It is by now clear to the public that there has been a consistent breakdown of the rule of law at Jersey and that the only argument for permitting ongoing obstruction to the police investigation and to the fair administration of justice has been system justification.

    The UK is responsible for safeguarding its own commitments to universal human rights, in the face of Europe and the world. It would be a betrayal to us all, and contrary to the spirit of its own involvement in Iraq and Afganistan, if it were to abandon its passion for the guarantee of fair play. The horrors described by the victims of abuse struck us all as unparalleled, and to think that the same rule that allowed and even concealed them is now being trusted to deliver justice constitutes a meaningful discredit to governance at Jersey and, up to now, in the UK.

    The Jersey establishment has made clear throughout the years the type of very flawed justice that it can provide. To allow this beloved island and its people to fall under the grip of oppression and hopelessness strikes as unbearable to many who, like me, believe that the promotion of freedoms in the world should be both peaceful and consistent.
    The estranged government of Jersey cannot guarantee elementary constituents of a competent and modern democracy and it should not be trusted to carry this mater through.

    The UK has been an historical beacon of freedoms and guarantees and, as a nation, it has never collectively bowed in the face of interests, threats or attacks. This traditional spirit has been one of your most admired traits and it is still very much an intrinsic component of modern Britain. Please do not allow it to evanesce into the fast, bright lights of an all too convenient compass. The people of Britain, and not just, deserve to be able to trust, as their unity is above all else a unity of confidence.

    Yours faithfully,

    Dr Helder Sousa Domingos

    I wish you the best of luck for the legal procedures.
    I regret that the great Mr Harper has left and that the regime is taking steps to intimidate the witnesses again.

    My best regards,

    Helder

    Reply
  64. Anonymous

    Stuart, a veiled swipe is made at you by (immigrant OAP) Edward Trevor in today’s JEP.

    Without naming you, he states that those who challenge the Bailiff’s authority “should leave”.

    That’s nice of him. Only been here five minutes, and he’s telling you to give up centuries of the old Syvret name and history! Cheeky bugger, tell him where to get off.

    Looking at his self-aggrandising (and probably self-penned) Wikipedia page at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Trevor_(Jersey), I am staggered to see him described (or describe himself) as a “British Politician” when he once sat on a UK town council and is currently a St Helier rates assessor! FFS, who does this man think he is???

    Reply
  65. Helder S. Domingos

    Dear Stuart,

    I would like to thank you for your courage and resolve in facing this oppressive regime, currently in breach of the UK commitments to the European commission and the world.

    I would like to share with your readers a letter that I have sent to the justice secretary.

    Here goes:

    Dear Justice Secretary,

    I have felt compelled to write to you this open letter expressing my frustration and deep sense of injustice with respect to the way in which the Haut de la Garenne child abuses at Jersey have been addressed, both by the islands establishment and by the UK government. I would, therefore, like to ask that the UK take over the investigation and appoint an independent legal team.

    It is by now clear to the public that there has been a consistent breakdown of the rule of law at Jersey and that the only argument for permitting ongoing obstruction to the police investigation and to the fair administration of justice has been system justification.

    The UK is responsible for safeguarding its own commitments to universal human rights, in the face of Europe and the world. It would be a betrayal to us all, and contrary to the spirit of its own involvement in Iraq and Afganistan, if it were to abandon its passion for the guarantee of fair play. The horrors described by the victims of abuse struck us all as unparalleled, and to think that the same rule that allowed and even concealed them is now being trusted to deliver justice constitutes a meaningful discredit to governance at Jersey and, up to now, in the UK.

    The Jersey establishment has made clear throughout the years the type of very flawed justice that it can provide. To allow this beloved island and its people to fall under the grip of oppression and hopelessness strikes as unbearable to many who, like me, believe that the promotion of freedoms in the world should be both peaceful and consistent.
    The estranged government of Jersey cannot guarantee elementary constituents of a competent and modern democracy and it should not be trusted to carry this mater through.

    The UK has been an historical beacon of freedoms and guarantees and, as a nation, it has never collectively bowed in the face of interests, threats or attacks. This traditional spirit has been one of your most admired traits and it is still very much an intrinsic component of modern Britain. Please do not allow it to evanesce into the fast, bright lights of an all too convenient compass. The people of Britain, and not just, deserve to be able to trust, as their unity is above all else a unity of confidence.

    Yours faithfully,

    Dr Helder Sousa Domingos

    I wish you the best of luck for the legal procedures.
    I regret that the great Mr Harper has left and that the regime is taking steps to intimidate the witnesses again.

    My best regards,

    Helder

    Reply
  66. Anonymous

    Child care expert calls for redress board for care leavers
    writes Maria Ahmed

    Posted: 19 August 2008

    A UK social work and police investigation team should be set up to assist with the Jersey child abuse inquiry, an expert has said.

    Liz Davies, senior social work lecturer at London Metropolitan University, said UK councils needed to identify children who may have been placed in Jersey homes, including the former site of Haut de la Garenne.

    The former social worker who blew the whistle on the Islington child abuse scandal in the 1990s, also called for a redress board to be set up to hear care leaver’s accounts and for a review of monitoring of known sex abuse perpetrators in Jersey.

    Davies, who went to Jersey to meet care leavers earlier this month, said: “It is entirely possible that some of the UK children [placed in Jersey homes] will have gone missing. A detailed search must be conducted with urgency for all children who might have suffered abuse and authorities must then trace the whereabouts of these children in their adulthood.”

    “There will be abusers who may not be brought to justice but who at the very least must never work with children again, and there must be risk strategies to protect children,” Davies said.

    She also criticised a recent report into Jersey’s children’s services by UK expert Andrew Williamson, calling it a “lost opportunity.”

    Davies called for a wider inquiry including analysis of serious case reviews and child protection referrals to see how abuse was previously dealt with on the island.

    Davies’ comments came as Jersey senator Stuart Syvret and John Hemming MP filed a legal action against justice minister Jack Straw for failing to intervene in the abuse case.

    According to media reports, the action contained a memo by senior police detective Lenny Harper that claimed victims had no faith in the system. Harper retired as head of the abuse investigation this month.

    http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/2008/08/19/109161/jersey-care-homes-uk-police-and-social-workers-should-investigate.html

    Reply
  67. Anonymous

    “Most people who have lived in that building as I did for part of my childhood have always felt a sense of dread at the sight of the place even before the recent revelations. I was one of the lucky ones who experienced and wirnessed very little but I could not watch the last series of Bergerac because that place was constantly being shown. I have always sensed evil in that place and that evil will not go until the building goes.”

    I hate to be personal, but do you ever wonder if you have repressed memories of some the events in your childhood there? Or night terrors, flashbacks, etc. I expect that some of the survivors will have this.

    DT

    Reply
  68. Res Nullius

    To the poster who asks:-

    “what happens when victims can give a good visual description of an abuser, but doesn’t know their name?” and “Do they have any chance of learning who these men are or indeed prosecuting them?”

    What the police need is what is termed ‘best evidence’. If the victim gives a detailed account of the abuse and can describe the abuser but does not know their name this does not detract from the remaining evidence.

    Clearly it is better if the victim can say “it was Mr A” but not knowing the name is not terribly important, If it were most crimes would go undetected.

    More specifically, in cases of an historical nature such as this the best evidence is likely to be ‘similar fact’ evidence (forensic and other evidence is likely to be limited); that is to say evidence from a number of different people who all give similar accounts, or accounts that fit seamlessly together, but have not had the opportunity to meet and discuss their evidence before talking to the police.

    Hypothetical e.g.

    Victim 1 says “This bloke did XYZ to me while I was in La Hocq School between 1972 and 1975. I don’t know his name but he was fat and walked with a limp”

    Victim 2 says “My teacher ‘Fatty’ Smith from La Hocq school had a walking stick and did x and z to me in 1969”

    Victim 1 and 2 have never met.

    This would be powerful evidence against Smith because the two accounts knit together. This means there is no chance of it being ‘one persons word against the other’ as one allegation supports the other independently.

    In response to the second part of your question, the answer is yes. If the police believe they have identified the perpetrator and particularly if he/she is being charged, then the victim will be kept informed.

    I hope that helps.

    Reply
  69. Anonymous

    res nullius……

    Thanks I sent that post, that is really helpful. I hope everything is cross referenced well in this investigation!!!

    Thanks again!

    Reply
  70. Anonymous

    Re `repressed memories’!

    Yes, I do and they are really odd! When I say memories….what I experience is more like the shutter of a camera opening and closing. In this, I am able to see (although very briefly) images of people and events.

    These events I know to be of what happened to me at HDLG. It’s really odd! Although, I have very clear memories of certain things that were done to me there and who it was that did them. Other memories which I feel to be much deeper and much darker just refuse to cristalize into anything that I can make sense of.

    It’s like diving into a swimming pool and the more I struggle toward the surface the harder it becomes. I just drown in my panick!
    I like you are overwhelmed with dread when I see that place. I moved away from that Island a very longtime ago and have no wish to return!

    I hope with all my heart that justice comes to Jersey. Not a day goes by without me thinking about what happened to us there, in that place all those year’s ago!

    Reply

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